Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Cancer Incidence

Using data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program, CEP members are conducting cancer incidence studies to identify patterns of disease in different groups and geographical areas over time. Researchers have focused their efforts on the following cancers:

Breast Cancer

Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL)

Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

Childhood Cancers

Melanoma

Other Cancers


Breast Cancer

CEP researchers are working to understand breast cancer incidence patterns in the San Francisco Bay Area, where some of the highest rates in the world have been reported. In addition to studying the impact of race, ethnicity and socioeconomic status, researchers have pursued studies evaluating the impact of alcohol consumption, hormone replacement therapies and breastfeeding on disease incidence as well as the long-term health benefits associated with new cancer screening tests and new treatment strategies.

Christina Clarke, PhD

Scarlett Gomez, PhD

SylviaPlevritis, PhD

Sally Glaser, PhD

Dee West, PhD


Hodgkin Lymphoma (HL)

A number of studies have been conducted to describe HL trends, spatial clustering and socioeconomic and racial gradients in HL incidence. Researcher are additionally working to characterize epidemiologic and survival patterns of EBV-associated HL by combining trend studies with assays for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in HL tumor cells.

Christina Clarke, PhD

Sally Glaser, PhD

Theresa Keegan, PhD


Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL)

NHL is a heterogeneous disease comprised of different types of lymphocyte. Patients with HIV infection are at much greater risk of NHL and have different disease characteristics and outcome than patients with sporadic disease. CEP researchers have undertaken numerous studies to evaluate the reliability of NHL diagnosis and sub-type classifications in population-based cancer registries over time.

Christina Clarke, PhD

Sally Glaser, PhD


Childhood Cancers

In collaboration with colleagues from the University of California San Francisco, the University of Southern California and the California Department of Health Services, CEP researchers have conducted surveillance and epidemiological studies of pediatric brain tumors. Key areas of interest include biologic and environmental risk factors, predictors of survivorship and the efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging in detecting relapse.

Paul Fisher, MD


Melanoma

CEP researchers are working with dermatologists to improvemelanoma surveillance in the San Francisco Bay Area. Current efforts focus on estimating the extent of missed invasive and in situ melanomas, such as lentigo maligna, and developing strategies to improve reporting and surveillance.

Christina Clarke, PhD

Theresa Keegan , PhD


Other Cancers

CEP researchers are evaluating different environmental contributors to Helicobacter pylori infection by examining infection rates and patterns among several generations of Hispanics in the San Francisco Bay Area. They found that the prevalence of H. pylori in immigrants and first-generation US-born Hispanics was almost ten-fold higher than that in second-generation US-born Hispanics. Since H. pylori infection is a strong risk factor for gastric adenocarcinoma, this work suggests these populations are at high risk for this cancer.

Julie Parsonnet, MD

 

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: