Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Christopher H. Contag

Publication Details

  • Definition of an Enhanced Immune Cell Therapy in Mice That Can Target Stem-Like Lymphoma Cells CANCER RESEARCH Contag, C. H., Sikorski, R., Negrin, R. S., Schmidt, T., Fan, A. C., Bachireddy, P., Felsher, D. W., Thorne, S. H. 2010; 70 (23): 9837-9845

    Abstract:

    Current treatments of high-grade lymphoma often have curative potential, but unfortunately many patients relapse and develop therapeutic resistance. Thus, there remains a need for novel therapeutics that can target the residual cancer cells whose phenotypes are distinct from the bulk tumor and that are capable of reforming tumors from very few cells. Oncolytic viruses offer an approach to destroy tumors by multiple mechanisms, but they cannot effectively reach residual disease or micrometastases, especially within the lymphatic system. To address these limitations, we have generated immune cells infected with oncolytic viruses as a therapeutic strategy that can combine effective cellular delivery with synergistic tumor killing. In this study, we tested this approach against minimal disease states of lymphomas characterized by the persistence of cancer cells that display stem cell-like properties and resistance to conventional therapies. We found that the immune cells were capable of trafficking to and targeting residual cancer cells. The combination biotherapy used prevented relapse by creating a long-term, disease-free state, with acquired immunity to the tumor functioning as an essential mediator of this effect. Immune components necessary for this acquired immunity were identified. We further demonstrated that the dual biotherapy could be applied before or after conventional therapy. Our approach offers a potentially powerful new way to clear residual cancer cells, showing how restoring immune surveillance is critical for maintenance of a disease-free state.

    View details for DOI 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-10-2650

    View details for Web of Science ID 000285045900033

    View details for PubMedID 20935221

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