Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

George Triadafilopoulos

Publication Details

  • Proton Pump Inhibitors for Gastroduodenal Damage Related to Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory Drugs or Aspirin: Twelve Important Questions for Clinical Practice CLINICAL GASTROENTEROLOGY AND HEPATOLOGY Arora, G., Singh, G., Triadafilopoulos, G. 2009; 7 (7): 725-735

    Abstract:

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and aspirin are among the most commonly used medications worldwide. Their use is associated with significant gastroduodenal adverse effects, including dyspepsia, bleeding, ulcer formation, and perforation. Given their long-term use by millions of patients, there is a substantial impact at the population level of these complications. In this evidence-based review, we have endeavored to answer 12 commonly encountered questions in clinical practice that deal with the following: extent of the problem of NSAID/aspirin-induced gastroduodenal damage and its impact on public health; role of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in the primary prevention, healing, and secondary prevention of NSAID/aspirin-induced gastroduodenal ulceration as assessed by using endoscopic end points; role of PPIs in the prevention of adverse clinical outcomes related to NSAID/aspirin use; whether PPIs are effective in NSAID-induced dyspepsia; comparison of PPI co-therapy with selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors for risk reduction of adverse clinical outcomes; role of PPIs in preventing rebleeding from aspirin +/- clopidogrel therapy in high-risk patients; identifying high-risk patients who can benefit from PPI co-therapy; the role of other gastroprotective agents for prevention of NSAID/aspirin-induced gastroduodenal damage; and the cost-effectiveness of and limitations to the use of PPIs for prevention of gastroduodenal damage related to the use of NSAIDs or aspirin. We then summarized our recommendations on the use of PPIs for the clinical management of patients using NSAIDs or aspirin.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.cgh.2009.03.015

    View details for Web of Science ID 000268430500007

    View details for PubMedID 19306941

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