Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

James L. Zehnder, M.D.

Publication Details

  • Effect of Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761) aggregation and platelet and aspirin on platelet analysis among older adults at risk of cardiovascular disease: a randomized clinical trial BLOOD COAGULATION & FIBRINOLYSIS Gardner, C. D., Zehnder, J. L., Rigby, A. J., Nicholus, J. R., Farquhar, J. W. 2007; 18 (8): 787-793

    Abstract:

    Several case reports have implicated Ginkgo biloba in clinically adverse bleeding disorders. Ginkgo biloba has been reported to increase pain-free walking distance among patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Standard PAD therapy includes 325 mg/day aspirin. The objective of this study was to examine potential adverse effects of concomitant aspirin and Ginkgo biloba on platelet function. Ginkgo biloba (EGb 761, 300 mg/day) was compared with placebo for effects on measures of platelet aggregation among adults consuming 325 mg/day aspirin in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel design trial of 4-week duration. Participants were adults, age 69 +/- 10 years, with PAD or risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Outcome measures included platelet function analysis (PFA-100 analyzer) using ADP as an agonist (n = 26 placebo; n = 29 ginkgo), and platelet aggregation using ADP, epinephrine, collagen and ristocetin as agonists (n = 21 placebo; n = 23 ginkgo). Participants kept daily logs of bleeding or bruising episodes. There were no clinically or statistically significant differences between treatment groups for any agonists, for either PFA-100 analysis or platelet aggregation. Reports of bleeding or bruising were infrequent and similar for both study groups. In conclusion, in older adults with PAD or cardiovascular disease risk, a relatively high dose of Ginkgo biloba combined with 325 mg/day daily aspirin did not have a clinically or statistically detectable impact on indices of coagulation examined over 4 weeks, compared with the effect of aspirin alone. No adverse bleeding events were observed, although the trial was limited to a small sample size.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000251271200012

    View details for PubMedID 17982321

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