Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Michael Link

Publication Details

  • HODGKINS-DISEASE - TREATMENT OF THE YOUNG-CHILD PEDIATRIC CLINICS OF NORTH AMERICA Donaldson, S. S., Link, M. P. 1991; 38 (2): 457-473

    Abstract:

    Age of a patient when afflicted with Hodgkin's disease is an important prognostic factor. Although there are histologic and stage differences as a function of age, the younger a patient is when diagnosed, the better the cure rate. Youngsters less than age 10 years have a freedom from relapse of 80% at 26 years follow-up examination; adolescents in the 11 to 16 age group have a freedom from relapse or 74%; and adults aged 17 years or older have a freedom from relapse of 64%. These differences translate into significant survival differences as well, with children aged 10 years or younger and those aged 11 to 16 years having a 26-year survival of 74%, as compared to adults, who have a 37% survival (P = 0.003). These differences remain significant when comparing those with stage I and II disease, as opposed to those with advanced stage III and IV disease. Children present the greatest challenges with respect to staging and treatment. The older child with localized disease can be managed appropriately as an adult. However, for the younger child the use of low-dose radiation and multiagent chemotherapy is widely accepted. Using this approach, survival rates of 85% or greater are reported from many large institutional and cooperative group experiences. The goals of treatment today are cure of disease, with maximal quality of life and minimal complications from the treatment. The late effects of greatest importance to the youngest children are skeletal and bone growth abnormalities, sterility, and malignant tumor induction. Treatment programs today should be directed towards refining therapy to minimize sequelae while maximizing quality of life. These goals are best achieved when children are managed in regional centers with demonstrated expertise in the management of children with Hodgkin's disease. Whereas cure can be achieved in a large majority of children diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease, our challenge is cure, with the least sequelae and the greatest quality of life. "Children are not simply micro-adults, but have their own specific problems."

    View details for Web of Science ID A1991GC73400014

    View details for PubMedID 1747155

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