Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

George Triadafilopoulos

Publication Details

  • Patient-derived health state utilities for gastroesophageal reflux disease AMERICAN JOURNAL OF GASTROENTEROLOGY Gerson, L. B., Ullah, N., Hastie, T., Triadafilopoulos, G., Goldstein, M. 2005; 100 (3): 524-533

    Abstract:

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease that adversely affects health-related quality of life. The purpose of this study was to derive health state utilities for patients with chronic heartburn symptoms.We used a custom-designed computer program in order to elicit utilities with the time-tradeoff and standard-gamble techniques. Patients with chronic (more than 6 months) symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease entered the study. Two interviews were performed in random sequence either initially on medications for heartburn that adequately controlled symptoms, or off of medications for 1 wk while the patient was symptomatic. We also collected data using visual-analog scales, quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD), and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) scores.We invited 222 patients to participate; 158 (71%) patients (129 men, 29 women) completed the study. Barrett's esophagus was present in 40 (25%), erosive disease in 17 (11%), and 118 (74%) had comorbid conditions. The mean (+/-SD) utility ratings were 0.94 +/- 0.09 on medical therapy and 0.90 +/- 0.12 off medications for patients with reflux alone using time tradeoff (p= 0.004), and 0.94 +/- 8.0 both on and off of antireflux medications with standard-gamble assessment (p= 0.96). Mean time-tradeoff scores were also significantly lower off of medications for patients with other comorbid conditions (p= 0.002). There was no significant difference between mean utility scores for patients with or without Barrett's esophagus or erosive disease.Gastroesophageal reflux disease adversely affects health-related quality of life. Time-tradeoff utility for patients with reflux disease is substantially higher when patients are on medication than off medications.

    View details for DOI 10.1111/j.1572-0241.40588.x

    View details for Web of Science ID 000227697900005

    View details for PubMedID 15743346

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