Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Susan Knox

Publication Details

  • THE EFFECT OF UNLABELED MONOCLONAL-ANTIBODY (MAB) ON THE BIODISTRIBUTION OF I-131 ANTIIDIOTYPE MAB IN MURINE B-CELL LYMPHOMA RADIOTHERAPY AND ONCOLOGY Schiele, J., Knox, S. J., RUEHL, W., Goris, M. L. 1992; 24 (3): 169-176

    Abstract:

    The 38C13 murine B cell lymphoma model was used to study the effect of the preinjection of unlabelled anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) on the subsequent biodistribution of 131I-anti-idiotype mAb. Mice with established tumors received 0-500 micrograms of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb 24 h prior to the administration of 131I-anti-idiotype (specific), or both 125I-anti-idiotype and 131I-isotype-matched irrelevant control (nonspecific) mAb. Mice were counted daily in a gamma counter and sacrificed at 2-144 h following injection. Mice were dissected and the weight and activity of the animals and organs were measured. Mice were bled periodically and circulating idiotype levels were measured using an ELISA assay. Five hundred micrograms of unlabelled anti-idiotype mAb increased the retention time of the specific but not the nonspecific mAb in all organs and tumor. Following pretreatment with unlabelled mAb, the cumulative tumor/whole body and tumor/normal organ ratios became similar to those of the nonspecific mAb, with concentration ratios (specific/nonspecific mAb) of approximately 1, which persisted until 96 h post injection when circulating idiotype reappears in antigen excess. In the absence of unlabelled mAb there was less retention in tumor and normal tissue. This is presumed to be due in part to decreased levels of circulating 131I-mAb secondary to rapid plasma clearance of antigen-antibody complexes and tumor cell mediated dehalogenation, which results when the specific mAb specifically binds the targeted antigen. Thus, the addition of unlabelled mAb increased the retention by decreasing the specific behavior of the anti-idiotypic antibody.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1992JL59000005

    View details for PubMedID 1410571

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