Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
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Samuel So

Publication Details

  • Effect of intraoperative blood transfusion on patient outcome in hepatic transplantation ARCHIVES OF SURGERY Cacciarelli, T. V., Keeffe, E. B., Moore, D. H., BURNS, W., Busque, S., Concepcion, W., So, S. K., Esquivel, C. O. 1999; 134 (1): 25-29

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the effect of intraoperative transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) on patient and graft survival.A retrospective study.A tertiary care referral center.Between January 1, 1992, and December 31, 1994, medical records from 225 adult patients who underwent primary liver transplantations were analyzed.Overall patient survival was 90% at 1 year and 86% at 3 years, while graft survival was 89% at 1 year and 85% at 3 years. The following factors were associated with patient and graft survival: age, sex, medical condition at the time of transplantation, and intraoperative transfusion of RBCs. When these factors were subjected to a multivariate analysis, all were independently associated with survival. Fifty-four recipients (24%) underwent transplantation without intraoperative transfusion of RBCs, while 171 recipients (76%) received at least 1 U of RBCs intraoperatively. Recipients who did not receive transfusion of RBCs had higher patient and graft survival rates than patients who did receive RBCs. By multivariate analysis, transplantation without intraoperative transfusion of RBCs no longer remained statistically significant, and only sex and the patient's medical condition were independently associated with patient and graft survival. Patient and graft survival decreased if 5 or more U were transfused, but transfusion of 5 or more U was not independently associated with survival by multivariate analysis.Increased transfusion requirement for RBCs was independently associated with patient and graft survival. While transplantation without transfusion of intraoperative RBCs was associated with superior patient and graft survival, these effects were overridden by patient sex and medical condition at the time of transplantation.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000078053500006

    View details for PubMedID 9927126

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