Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Richard Hoppe

Publication Details

  • Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma of the paranasal sinuses: Clinical and pathological features, and response to combined-modality therapy CANCER JOURNAL Hausdorff, J., Davis, E., Long, G., Hoppe, R., VANDERPAS, M., Lassman, C., Kamel, O., Jacobs, C. 1997; 3 (5): 303-311

    Abstract:

    Lymphomas of the paranasal sinuses may have poorer prognoses compared with other extranodal lymphomas of the head and neck, and are not well defined as a particular clinicopathologic entity. The outcome of combined-modality therapy and central nervous system (CNS) prophylaxis has not been fully determined.We retrospectively reviewed our experience with 16 consecutive, carefully defined patients, all treated with both chemotherapy and radiotherapy.There were 11 men and five women, mean age 52. All presented with local symptoms; 13 had stage I or II disease. Thirteen had diffuse large cell lymphoma, two diffuse mixed, and one small noncleaved. Phenotyping revealed 10 B-cell, four T-cell, and two T or natural killer (NK). Most received CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, prednisone) chemotherapy; the order of chemotherapy and radiotherapy varied. Twelve received CNS prophylaxis. Of 12 complete responses, six relapsed, all at distant sites, and two died during initial therapy. Five-year survival was 29%, and median survival 18 months. Four of 10 B-lineage patients were relapse-free at 4 years; all six T- or T/NK-lineage patients relapsed or were dead within 6 months. Tumors of T or NK lineage often expressed CD56 and showed evidence of Epstein-Barr viral infection; otherwise, pathological features were not predictive of lineage or outcome. Neither age nor lactate dehydrogenase predicted prognosis. No complete responder recurred in the CNS as site of first relapse.Despite localized stage at presentation, sinus lymphoma is an aggressive disease, characterized by distant relapse and early mortality. Combined-modality therapy with CNS prophylaxis improves outcome compared with radiotherapy alone; however, prognosis remains poor. Patients with T-lineage disease appear to have a particularly bad outcome. Autologous bone marrow transplantation should be evaluated as first-line therapy for those at high risk of relapse.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1997XX75500011

    View details for PubMedID 9327155

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