Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Susan Knox

Publication Details

  • Intratumoral radioimmunotherapy of a human colon cancer xenograft using a sustained-release gel RADIOTHERAPY AND ONCOLOGY Ning, S., Trisler, K., Brown, D. M., Yu, N. Y., Kanekal, S., Lundsten, M. J., Knox, S. J. 1996; 39 (2): 179-189

    Abstract:

    Low tumor uptake and normal tissue toxicity limit the efficacy of RIT for the treatment of solid tumors. In this study, an intratumoral injectable gel drug delivery system for local administration of RIT was evaluated using the LS174T human colon cancer xenograft model in SCID mice. The injectable gel is a collagen-based drug delivery system designed for intratumoral (i.t.) administration, which has previously been shown to enhance drug retention at the injection site and reduce systemic drug exposure. We compared the local (tumor) retention and biodistribution of 111In-labeled NR-LU-10 monoclonal antibody given i.t. in the injectable gel versus simple aqueous solution. 111In gel given i.t. and 111In-NR-LU-10 given intraperitoneally (i.p.) were used as controls. The results showed that tumors treated with 111In-NR-LU-10 gel maintained the highest levels of radioactivity for up to 96 h. At 48 h after the administration of 111In-NR-LU-10 gel i.t., 111In-NR-LU-10 solution i.t., 111In gel i.t., or 111In-NR-LU-10 i.p., the level of radioactivity remaining in each gram of tumor was 98, 49, 45, and 16% of the injected dose, respectively. It was estimated that if 100 microCi of 90Y-NR-LU-10 were administered similarly, tumor treated with 90Y-NR-LU-10 gel i.t. would receive a dose of 90.0 Gy, whereas normal tissues in the same animal would receive a dose of approximately 2.43 Gy. In contrast, if 90Y-NR-LU-10 were delivered i.p., a comparable tumor would receive a dose of 16.8 Gy and corresponding normal tissues would receive 3.36 Gy. Consistent with these estimates, enhanced antitumor efficacy was observed when 90Y-NR-LU-10 gel was administered i.t. Tumor growth delay time was 6.9-fold (P < 0.01) longer in these animals (14.4 days) than in animals treated with 90Y-NR-LU-10 i.p. (2.1 days). Systemic toxicity was also significantly reduced in gel-treated animals as monitored by loss of body weight. This study demonstrated that intratumoral delivery of 90Y-NR-LU-10 gel markedly increased the retention of the radioisotope in tumors, enhanced the antitumor efficacy, and reduced systemic toxicity compared to systemic administration of the radiolabeled antibody. This injectable gel drug delivery system may allow for improvement in the therapeutic index for RIT.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1996UM70100011

    View details for PubMedID 8735485

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