Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Susan Knox

Publication Details

  • THE SELECTIVE GROWTH OF HUMAN LYMPHOCYTE-T COLONIES FROM WHOLE-BLOOD IN A SEMISOLID CULTURE SYSTEM EXPERIMENTAL HEMATOLOGY Knox, S. J., SHIFRINE, M., Wilson, F. D., ROSENBLATT, L. S. 1981; 9 (9): 926-937

    Abstract:

    Human T lymphocyte colonies may be selectively grown from whole blood in a single phase semisolid culture system following stimulation with PHA-P, Con-A, or PPD. This technique eliminates the requirement for gradient-enriched lymphocyte fractions, and provides a sensitive system for the study of T lymphocyte progenitors that more closely approximates the in vivo milieu. Whole blood colonies were composed of lymphoblasts and mature lymphocytes. Individual colony cells, identified as T lymphocytes, lacked lipase and specific esterase activity, formed E rosettes, did not phagocytize latex beads, and were largely ANAE positive. Whole blood was plated at a final concentration of 3%. Optimal mitogen/antigen concentrations were 125 microgram Con-A, 80 microgram PHA-P and 50 microgram PPD/ml culture media. Peak colony growth occurred between days 7 and 8. Colony formation increased as a power function over a wide range of cell concentrations (5 x 10(3)-5 x 10(4) lymphocytes plated). Maximal whole blood colony formation occurred when 5 x 10(4)-10(5) lymphocytes were plated. There was a significant increase in the cloning efficiency using whole blood as compared to gradient-separated cells. This method has wide application for the study of radiation effects, lymphocyte alterations in various disease states, antigen recognition, and the induction and amplification of T cell function.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1981ML45700005

    View details for PubMedID 6978263

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