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Nelson Teng

Publication Details

  • PRODUCTION OF HUMAN MONOCLONAL IGG ANTIBODIES AGAINST RHESUS (D) ANTIGEN PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES Bron, D., Feinberg, M. B., Teng, N. N., KAPLAN, H. S. 1984; 81 (10): 3214-3217

    Abstract:

    An Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed human B-cell line ( LB4r ) producing anti-Rhesus [Rho(D) antigen] antibody was fused with a non-immunoglobulin-producing mouse-human heteromyeloma ( SHM - D33 ) and selected in hypoxanthine/aminopterin/thymidine medium containing 0.5 microM ouabain. Surviving hybrids found to secrete specific anti-Rho(D) antibody were cloned by limiting dilution. Two clones (D4-B2 and E10-C1) producing high levels (12 and 20 micrograms/ml per 10(6) cells per 24 hr, respectively) of monospecific antibody (IgG3, lambda chain) were selected for expansion and further characterization. Compared to the parental cell line ( LB4r ), these hybridoma cell lines presented several advantages: antibody production was increased 10-fold, cloning efficiency was improved, and the EBV genome was not retained. Antibody production has been stable for greater than 8 months. These human monoclonal anti-Rho(D) antibodies have demonstrated utility in routine blood-group typing. They may also prove useful in the biochemical and genetic characterization of the Rh antigen system. Most important, they offer a source of Rh-immune globulin for the prevention of Rh immunization and alloimmune hemolytic disease of the newborn.

    View details for Web of Science ID A1984SU47600056

    View details for PubMedID 6427767

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