Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

James D. Brooks

Publication Details

  • Recurrent deletion of CHD1 in prostate cancer with relevance to cell invasiveness ONCOGENE Huang, S., Gulzar, Z. G., Salari, K., Lapointe, J., Brooks, J. D., Pollack, J. R. 2012; 31 (37): 4164-4170

    Abstract:

    Though prostate cancer is often indolent, it is nonetheless a leading cause of cancer death. Defining the underlying molecular genetic alterations may lead to new strategies for prevention or treatment. Towards this goal, we performed array-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) on 86 primary prostate tumors. Among the most frequent alterations not associated with a known cancer gene, we identified focal deletions within 5q21 in 15 out of 86 (17%) cases. By high-resolution tiling array CGH, the smallest common deletion targeted just one gene, the chromatin remodeler chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1). Expression of CHD1 was significantly reduced in tumors with deletion (P=0.03), and compared with normal prostate (P=0.04). Exon sequencing analysis also uncovered nonsynonymous mutations in 1 out of 7 (14%) cell lines (LAPC4) and in 1 out of 24 (4%) prostate tumors surveyed. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of CHD1 in two nontumorigenic prostate epithelial cell lines, OPCN2 and RWPE-1, did not alter cell growth, but promoted cell invasiveness, and in OPCN2-enhanced cell clonogenicity. Taken together, our findings suggest that CHD1 deletion may underlie cell invasiveness in a subset of prostate cancers, and indicate a possible novel role of altered chromatin remodeling in prostate tumorigenesis.

    View details for DOI 10.1038/onc.2011.590

    View details for Web of Science ID 000308688900008

    View details for PubMedID 22179824

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: