Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Dean W. Felsher

Publication Details

  • Loss of Dnmt3b function upregulates the tumor modifier Ment and accelerates mouse lymphomagenesis JOURNAL OF CLINICAL INVESTIGATION Hlady, R. A., Novakova, S., Opavska, J., Klinkebiel, D., Peters, S. L., Bies, J., Hannah, J., Iqbal, J., Anderson, K. M., Siebler, H. M., Smith, L. M., Greiner, T. C., Bastola, D., Joshi, S., Lockridge, O., Simpson, M. A., Felsher, D. W., Wagner, K., Chan, W. C., Christman, J. K., Opavsky, R. 2012; 122 (1): 163-177

    Abstract:

    DNA methyltransferase 3B (Dnmt3b) belongs to a family of enzymes responsible for methylation of cytosine residues in mammals. DNA methylation contributes to the epigenetic control of gene transcription and is deregulated in virtually all human tumors. To better understand the generation of cancer-specific methylation patterns, we genetically inactivated Dnmt3b in a mouse model of MYC-induced lymphomagenesis. Ablation of Dnmt3b function using a conditional knockout in T cells accelerated lymphomagenesis by increasing cellular proliferation, which suggests that Dnmt3b functions as a tumor suppressor. Global methylation profiling revealed numerous gene promoters as potential targets of Dnmt3b activity, the majority of which were demethylated in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas, but not in Dnmt3b-/- pretumor thymocytes, implicating Dnmt3b in maintenance of cytosine methylation in cancer. Functional analysis identified the gene Gm128 (which we termed herein methylated in normal thymocytes [Ment]) as a target of Dnmt3b activity. We found that Ment was gradually demethylated and overexpressed during tumor progression in Dnmt3b-/- lymphomas. Similarly, MENT was overexpressed in 67% of human lymphomas, and its transcription inversely correlated with methylation and levels of DNMT3B. Importantly, knockdown of Ment inhibited growth of mouse and human cells, whereas overexpression of Ment provided Dnmt3b+/+ cells with a proliferative advantage. Our findings identify Ment as an enhancer of lymphomagenesis that contributes to the tumor suppressor function of Dnmt3b and suggest it could be a potential target for anticancer therapies.

    View details for DOI 10.1172/JCI57292

    View details for Web of Science ID 000298769400022

    View details for PubMedID 22133874

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