Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
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Kristen N Ganjoo

Publication Details

  • Germ cell tumor associated primitive neuroectodermal tumors JOURNAL OF UROLOGY Ganjoo, K. N., Foster, R. S., Michael, H., Donohue, J. P., Einhorn, L. H. 2001; 165 (5): 1514-1516

    Abstract:

    This retrospective review was done to assess the prognosis and response in patients presenting with primitive neuroectodermal tumor admixed with germ cell tumor.Of the 40 patients treated at our institution from 1984 to 1999, 15 had initial stage I and 25 had initial metastatic disease. Median followup after the diagnosis was 25 months (range 4 to 142).Of the 40 patients 15 presented with clinical stage I disease, including 9 treated with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection and 6 who elected surveillance. Seven of the 9 patients had normal lymph nodes and all continuously had no evidence of disease. Two of the 9 patients had lymph nodes involved with teratoma with or without primitive neuroectodermal tumor. Retroperitoneal relapse in 5 of the 6 patients on surveillance was treated with cisplatin based chemotherapy followed by post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection. Residual primitive neuroectodermal tumor was noted in 4 of the 5 patients and only 3 of 6 are currently without disease at a median followup of 17 months (range 15 to 69). A total of 25 patients presented with metastatic disease, of whom 23 underwent cisplatin based chemotherapy. Only 3 patients achieved complete remission with chemotherapy alone and 2 of the 3 subsequently relapsed. Of the remaining 20 patients 16 underwent post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, including 11 with primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the resected specimen. Two of these 11 patients have continuously had no evidence of disease, while an additional 3 currently have no evidence of disease after further therapy. Teratoma was present in the resected specimen in 5 of 16 patients, of whom 2 have continuously had no evidence of disease, while an additional 2 currently have no evidence of disease after further surgical resection. Therefore, 11 of 25 patients who presented with metastatic disease currently have no evidence of disease at a median followup of 19 months (range 2 to 111).Primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the orchiectomy specimen has adverse prognostic significance. This condition in the retroperitoneum is potentially curable by retroperitoneal lymph node dissection but rarely eradicated by chemotherapy. Therefore, we recommend retroperitoneal lymph node dissection for all clinical stage I cases with primitive neuroectodermal tumor in the orchiectomy specimen. Patients who present with metastatic primitive neuroectodermal tumor should be treated aggressively with surgical resection as an integral part of the therapeutic strategy.

    View details for Web of Science ID 000168321500030

    View details for PubMedID 11342908

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