Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Quynh-Thu Le

Publication Details

  • ON-BOARD IMAGING VALIDATION OF OPTICALLY GUIDED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY POSITIONING SYSTEM FOR CONVENTIONALLY FRACTIONATED RADIOTHERAPY FOR PARANASAL SINUS AND SKULL BASE CANCER INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RADIATION ONCOLOGY BIOLOGY PHYSICS Maxim, P. G., Loo, B. W., Murphy, J. D., Chu, K. P., Hsu, A., Quynh-Thu Le, Q. T. 2011; 81 (4): 1153-1159

    Abstract:

    To evaluate the positioning accuracy of an optical positioning system for stereotactic radiosurgery in a pilot experience of optically guided, conventionally fractionated, radiotherapy for paranasal sinus and skull base tumors.Before each daily radiotherapy session, the positioning of 28 patients was set up using an optical positioning system. After this initial setup, the patients underwent standard on-board imaging that included daily orthogonal kilovoltage images and weekly cone beam computed tomography scans. Daily translational shifts were made after comparing the on-board images with the treatment planning computed tomography scans. These daily translational shifts represented the daily positional error in the optical tracking system and were recorded during the treatment course. For 13 patients treated with smaller fields, a three-degree of freedom (3DOF) head positioner was used for more accurate setup.The mean positional error for the optically guided system in patients with and without the 3DOF head positioner was 1.4 ± 1.1 mm and 3.9 ± 1.6 mm, respectively (p <.0001). The mean positional error drifted 0.11 mm/wk upward during the treatment course for patients using the 3DOF head positioner (p = .057). No positional drift was observed in the patients without the 3DOF head positioner.Our initial clinical experience with optically guided head-and-neck fractionated radiotherapy was promising and demonstrated clinical feasibility. The optically guided setup was especially useful when used in conjunction with the 3DOF head positioner and when it was recalibrated to the shifts using the weekly portal images.

    View details for DOI 10.1016/j.ijrobp.2010.08.049

    View details for Web of Science ID 000296823600035

    View details for PubMedID 21543166

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