Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Atul Butte

Publication Details

  • Protein Microarrays Discover Angiotensinogen and PRKRIP1 as Novel Targets for Autoantibodies in Chronic Renal Disease MOLECULAR & CELLULAR PROTEOMICS Butte, A. J., Sigdel, T. K., Wadia, P. P., Miklos, D. B., Sarwal, M. M. 2011; 10 (3)

    Abstract:

    Biomarkers for early detection of chronic kidney disease are needed, as millions of patients suffer from chronic diseases predisposing them to kidney failure. Protein microarrays may also hold utility in the discovery of auto-antibodies in other conditions not commonly considered auto-immune diseases. We hypothesized that proteins are released as a consequence of damage at a cellular level during end-organ damage from renal injury, not otherwise recognized as self-antigens, and an adaptive humoral immune response to these proteins might be detected in the blood, as a noninvasive tracker of this injury. The resultant antibodies (Ab) detected in the blood would serve as effective biomarkers for occult renal injury, enabling earlier clinical detection of chronic kidney disease than currently possible, because of the redundancy of the serum creatinine as a biomarker for early kidney injury. To screen for novel autoantibodies in chronic kidney disease, 24 protein microarrays were used to compare serum Ab from patients with chronic kidney disease against matched controls. From a panel of 38 antigens with increased Ab binding, four were validated in 71 individuals, with (n=50) and without (n=21) renal insufficiency. Significant elevations in the titer of novel auto-Ab were noted against angiotensinogen and PRKRIP1 in renal insufficiency. Current validation is underway to evaluate if these auto-Ab can provide means to follow the evolution of chronic kidney disease in patients with early stages of renal insufficiency, and if these rising titers of these auto-Ab correlate with the rate of progression of chronic kidney disease.

    View details for DOI 10.1074/mcp.M110.000497

    View details for Web of Science ID 000287847200001

    View details for PubMedID 21183621

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