Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Department: Stanford Cancer Institute

Cancer Immunology

  • Professor (Research) of Health Research and Policy, Emeritus
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
  • Klaus Bensch Professor in Pathology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Member, Stanford Neurosciences Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Pathology Anatomic
    • Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Research Interest

    Our interests include:
    1) The physiology and significance of lymphocyte homing in local and systemic immunity;
    2) biochemical and genetic studies of molecules that direct leukocyte recruitment;
    3) cellular and molecular genetic studies of leukocyte chemotaxis and the role of chemokines;
    4) vascular differentiation in normal and pathologic inflammatory states;
    5) systems and chemical biology approaches to understanding the regulation of lymphocyte trafficking programs.

  • Assistant Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Allergy and Immunology
    • Pediatric Allergy/Immun
    Research Interest

    Our laboratory's goal is to address fundamental and therapeutic questions in immunology using innovative nanotechnological and biophysical approaches to visualize and manipulate cells. Our primary focus is on understanding the molecular controls that balance T cell activation versus tolerance. The ultimate aim of our work is to manipulate T cell signaling pathways to control immunologically-mediated diseases.

  • Professor of Microbiology & Immunology
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Contribution of T cells to immunocompetence and autoimmunity; how the immune system clears infection, avoids autoimmunity and how infection impacts on the development of immune responses.

  • The Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Molecular mechanisms of lymphocyte recognition and differentiation; Systems immunology and human immunology; vaccination and infection.

  • Professor of Pathology and of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Member, Stanford Neurosciences Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Pathology
    • Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Research Interest

    Dendritic cells, NK cells and T cells; functional proteins and genes; immunotherapeutic approaches to cancer and autoimmune disease.

  • Professor of Medicine (Immunology and Rheumatology)
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Immunology and Rheumatology
    • Allergy and Immunology
    Research Interest

    My lab of molecular and cellular immunology is interested in research in the general field of T cell activation and autoimmunity. We use lentiviral mediated transduction of murine dendritic cells with immunoregulatory proteins for site specific and targeted immunotherapy. We have identified and characterized a gene (GRAIL) that seems to control T cell anergy. We have recently characterized a gene (Deaf1) that seems to play a major role in peripheral tolerance in T1D.

  • The Mary Hewitt Loveless, M.D. Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Pathology
    • Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    Research Interest

    The goals of Dr. Galli's laboratory are to understand the regulation of mast cell and basophil development and the expression of mast cell and basophil function, and to develop and use genetic approaches to elucidate the roles of these cells in health and disease.

  • Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology and of Structural Biology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Structural and functional studies of transmembrane receptor interactions with their ligands in systems relevant to human health and disease - primarily in immunity, infection, and neurobiology. We study these problems using protein engineering, structural, biochemical, and combinatorial biology approaches.

  • Professor (Research) of Genetics
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    B-cell development; Ig rearrangement and repertoire analysis; T cell regulation of antibody responses; T cell subsets; glutathione regulation of HIV disease progression; Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) related software development and gene arrays.

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • GI Oncology
    • Medical Oncology
    • Oncology (Cancer)
    Research Interest

    Cancer genomics and genetics, translational applications of next generation sequencing technologies, development of molecular signatures as prognostic and predictive biomarkers in oncology, primary genomic and proteomic technology development

  • Shelagh Galligan Professor in the School of Medicine, Emeritus
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Mechanisms and therapies for infection, cancer, autoimmunity and transplantation.

  • Professor of Pediatrics (Immunology) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Pediatric Infectious Disease
    • Primary Immunodeficiency
    Research Interest

    My laboratory has two major research interests. First, to define cellular and molecular mechanisms that limit T cell responses to vaccines and pathogens during normal early postnatal development and in cases of inherited genetic immunodeficiencies. Second, to determine how these limitations in immunity can be overcome by using novel approaches for vaccine adjuvants, with a particular focus on anti-viral vaccines.

  • Professor (Research) of Surgery (Transplantation)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    EBV B cell lymphomas; pathways of immune evasion in the growth and survival of EBV B cell lymphomas; mechanisms of graft rejection and tolerance induction; stem cell and solid organ transplantation.

  • Professor of Medicine, Emerita
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Immunology and Rheumatology
    • Allergy and Immunology
    Research Interest

    The lab is studying the mechanisms controlling B cell responsiveness and the balance between tolerance and autoimmunity. B cells deficient in CD72 are hyperresponsive to stimulation through the B cell receptor. We are examining the alterations in B cell signaling in these B cells and the mechanisms by which CD72 deficiency partially abrogates anergic tolerance. We hope to learn how deficiency in CD72 leads to spontaneous autoimmunity and increased susceptibility to induced autoimmune disease.

  • Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Our laboratory studies virus-host interactions with an emphasis microRNA-mediated gene regulation and on translational control. The mechanism by which a liver-specific microRNA regulates hepatitis C virus genome replication is under intense scrutiny. In addition, the mechanism of internal ribosome entry in certain cellular and viral mRNAs and its biological role in growth and development is being investigated.

Stanford Medicine Resources:

Footer Links: