Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Department: Stanford Cancer Institute

N

  • Assistant Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    We study the primary cilium, a once-obscure cellular organelle recently "re-discovered" for its role in a number of signaling pathways. Defects in cilium biogenesis lead to a variety of hereditary disorders characterized by retinal degeneration, kidney cysts and obesity. Our goal is to characterize these disorders at the molecular and cellular levels to gain insight into the basic mechanisms of primary cilium biogenesis and to discover novel ciliary signaling pathways.

  • Professor of Radiology (General Radiology) and, by courtesy, of Medicine (Medical Informatics) and of Electrical Engineering
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    My research seeks to advance the clinical and basic sciences in radiology, while improving our understanding of biology and the manifestations of disease, by pioneering methods in the information sciences that integrate imaging, clinical and molecular data. A current focus is on content-based radiological image retrieval and integration of imaging features with clinical and molecular data for diagnostic, prognostic, and therapy planning decision support.

  • Professor of Pathology at Stanford University Medical Center
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Hematopathology
    • Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
    • Anatomic Pathology
    Research Interest

    My research interests focus on the identification and characterization of markers of diagnostic and prognostic importance in hematolymphoid neoplasia.

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Thoracic Oncology
    • Thoracic Oncology
    • Lung Cancer
    Research Interest

    Applying new technologies to the diagnosis, characterization, and treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

  • Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Blood and Marrow Transplant
    • Hematology
    • Blood and Marrow Transplantation
    Research Interest

    Our labaratory focuses on the study of immune recognition by T and NK cells with special emphasis on graft vs host disease and graft vs tumor reactions. We utilize both murine and human systems in an effort to enhance graft vs tumor reactions while controlling graft vs host disease. We have developed bioluminescence models in collaboration with the Contag laboratory to study the trafficking of immune effector cells with a special emphasis on NK, T and regulatory T cells.

  • Rudy J. and Daphne Donohue Munzer Professor in the School of Medicine and Professor of Molecular and Cellular Physiology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Our research objectives are to understand the cellular mechanisms involved in the development and maintenance of epithelial cell polarity. Polarized epithelial cells play fundamental roles in the ontogeny and function of a variety of tissues and organs.

  • Research Interest

    Dr. Nguyen is interested in cancer prevention and control in ethnic and socio-economic underserved communities and health disparities.

  • Addie and Al Macovski Professor in the School of Engineering
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    medical imaging, magnetic resonance imaging

  • Rachford and Carlota Harris Professor
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Dr. Nolan's group uses high throughput single cell analysis technology of kinase driven signaling cascades to interrogate autoimmunity, cancer, virology (influenza), bacterial pathogens as well as understanding normal immune system function. Using advanced flow cytometric techniques such as Mass Cytometry and computational biology approaches, we focus on high throughput drug screening, mouse models of disease in patient materials, and understanding disease processes at the single cell level.

  • The Robert L. and Mary Ellenburg Professor in Surgery
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • GI Oncology
    • Adrenal Cancer
    • Carcinoid Tumors
    Research Interest

    Interleukin-12 is a Th1 cytokine. It is important in the cell mediated immune response. We are investigating its role as an anti-tumor cytokine to augment the immune response against cancer. We are planning a human trial.

  • Virginia and Daniel K. Ludwig Professor in Cancer Research
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Our laboratory studies Wnt signaling in development and disease. We found recently that Wnt proteins are unusual growth factors, because they are lipid-modified. We discovered that Wnt proteins promote the proliferation of stem cells of various origins. Current work is directed at understanding the function of the lipid on the Wnt, using Wnt proteins as factors the expand stem cells and on understanding Wnt signaling during repair and regeneration after tissue injury.

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