Cancer Institute A national cancer institute
designated cancer center

Department: Stanford Cancer Institute

A

  • Saul A. Rosenberg, MD, Professor of Lymphoma
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Lymphoma
    • Burkitt's Lymphoma
    • Hodgkin's Disease
    Research Interest

    Clinical investigation in Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas and cutaneous lymphomas. Experimental therapeutics with novel chemotherapy and biologically targeted therapies.

    The research program is highly collaborative with radiation oncology, industry, pathology and dermatology.

  • Associate Professor of Pediatrics (Stem Cell Transplantation) at the Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Pediatric
    • Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Pediatric
    • Pediatric Hematology-Oncology
    Research Interest

    Hematopoietic Stem cell biology-created a SCID mouse model to study engraftment of cord blood derived hematopoietic cells and use of this model to develop gene transfer technology for Fanconi anemia.Clinical research interests are to develop new protocols to reduce toxicity from high doses of chemotherapy and radiation therapy and development of a comprehensive late effects clinic for the long term follow up of transplant patients.

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (Oncology)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Lymphoma
    • Lymphoma
    • B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia
    Research Interest

    My research is focused on attaining a better understanding of the initiation, maintenance, and progression of tumors, and their response to current therapies toward improving future treatment strategies. In this effort, I employ tools from functional genomics, computational biology, molecular genetics, and mouse models.

    Clinically, I specialize in the care of patients with lymphomas, working on translating our findings in prospective cancer clinical trials.

  • Kenneth Fong Professor and Professor of Bioengineering, of Genetics, of Medicine (General Medical Discipline) and, by courtesy, of Computer Science
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Internal Medicine
    Research Interest

    I refer you to my web page for detailed list of interests, projects and publications. In addition to pressing the link here, you can search "Russ Altman" on http://www.google.com/

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (Endocrinology)
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Internal Medicine
    • Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma
    • Hereditary Endocrine Disorders
    Research Interest

    The ANNES LABORATORY of Molecular Endocrinology: Leveraging Chemical Biology to Treat Endocrine Disorders

    DIABETES
    The prevalence of diabetes is increasing at a staggering rate. By the year 2050 an astounding 25% of Americans will be diabetic. The goal of my research is to uncover therapeutic strategies to stymie the ensuing diabetes epidemic. To achieve this goal we have developed a variety of innovate experimental approaches to uncover novel approaches to curing diabetes.

    (1) Beta-Cel

  • Clinical Focus
    • Psychology
    • Behavior Therapy
    • Interpersonal Relations
    Research Interest

    Teaching & clinical interests include: Supervision, training, and mentoring of postdoctoral fellows and residents; consultation. Brief and long-term therapy: CBT, IPT, mood regulation & psychodynamic approaches.

  • Assistant Professor of Medicine (Blood and Marrow Transplantation) at the Stanford University Medical Center
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Blood and Marrow Transplant
    • Hematology
    • Blood and Marrow Transplantation
    Research Interest

    Research interest in utilizing post-transplant adoptive cellular immunotherapy to reduce GVHD and relapse in patients with high risk hematologic malignancies.

  • Ronald F. Dorfman, MBBch, FRCPath Professor in Hematopathology
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Anatomic/Clinical Pathology
    • Hematopathology
    • Pathology
    Research Interest

    I study molecular genetic and immunophenotypic changes in human hematopoietic neoplasms. These include acute and chronic leukemias, lymphoma, and splenic tumors.

  • Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and of Biochemistry
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Hematology
    • Medical Oncology
    Research Interest

    Telomeres are nucleoprotein complexes that protect chromosome ends and shorten with cell division and aging. We are interested in how telomere shortening influences cancer, stem cell function, aging and human disease. Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase that synthesizes telomere repeats and is expressed in stem cells and in cancer. We have found that telomerase also regulates stem cells and we are pursuing the function of telomerase through diverse genetic and biochemical approaches.

  • Vice Provost and Dean of Research, Lucile Salter Packard Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Microbiology and Immunology
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Clinical Focus
    • Infectious Diseases, Pediatric
    • Pediatric Infectious Disease
    Research Interest

    Our laboratory investigates the pathogenesis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection, focusing on the functional roles of particular viral gene products in pathogenesis and virus-cell interactions in differentiated human cells in humans and in Scid-hu mouse models of VZV cell tropisms in vivo, and the immunobiology of VZV infections.

  • Professor of Radiation Oncology (Radiation Biology) and of Genetics
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Child Health Research Institute
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Our research is aimed at defining the pathways of p53-mediated apoptosis and tumor suppression, using a combination of biochemical, cell biological, and mouse genetic approaches. Our strategy is to start by generating hypotheses about p53 mechanisms of action using primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and then to test them using gene targeting technology in the mouse.

  • Professor of Pathology
    Member, Bio-X
    Member, Stanford Cancer Institute
    Research Interest

    Genetic and cell biological analyses of signals controlling cell polarity and morphogenesis. Frizzled signaling and cytoskeletal organization.

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